HKPORI releases the latest popularity of government, social wellbeing indicators and Public Sentiment Index (2022-05-24)

May 24, 2022
Hong Kong Public Opinion Research Institute Press Conference – Press Materials

Press Conference Live

Speakers:
Chris Li – Assistant Professor, Faculty of Social Sciences, UOW College, Hong Kong
Paul Wong – Lecturer, Faculty of Social Sciences, UOW College Hong Kong

Detailed Findings

 

Special Announcements

The predecessor of Hong Kong Public Opinion Research Institute (PORI) was The Public Opinion Programme at The University of Hong Kong (HKUPOP). “PORI” in this release can refer to Hong Kong Public Opinion Research Institute or its predecessor HKUPOP.

Incidental to PORI’s ongoing half-yearly review, after May Fourth this year (May 4, 2022, i.e., PORI’s 3rd Anniversary), PORI has decided to reduce the frequency of our press conferences to about four times a month, in order to spare more resources for our online civic education work. Besides, PORI would also like to stress the separation of comments from figures, so that the responsibility of all personal comments arising from our scientific research lies entirely on the commentators concerned, not PORI.

Abstract

PORI successfully interviewed 1,003 Hong Kong residents by a random telephone survey conducted by real interviewers in mid-May.

Our social well-being survey shows that, among the ten specific domains, people rated personal safety the highest. They also tended to think that Hong Kong people can enjoy personal freedom and have opportunities for suitable employment. However, the rest of the social well-being indicators score lower than 5, representing people’s relative negative appraisals towards them. The last two indicators even score lower than 4, meaning they felt people can’t quite live without worries, and quite some political rights are missing. Among various indicators, the indicator on opportunities for suitable employment has significantly decreased compared to three months ago.

The latest net satisfaction of the HKSAR Government stands at negative 40 percentage points. Meanwhile, the net trust value stands at negative 11 percentage points. As for people’s satisfaction with the current political, livelihood and economic conditions, the net satisfaction rates are negative 24, negative 32 and negative 47 percentage points respectively. All the above figures have not changed much compared to a month ago. As for the PSI, the latest figure is 80.1, up by 2.6 points from early May.

The effective response rate of the survey is 40.9%. The maximum sampling error of percentages is +/-4%, that of net values is +/-7% and that of ratings is +/-0.24 at 95% confidence level.

 

Contact Information

Date of survey : 12-20/5/2022
Survey method : Random telephone survey conducted by real interviewers
Target population : Cantonese-speaking Hong Kong residents aged 18 or above
Sample size[1] : 1,003 (including 503 landline and 500 mobile samples)
Effective response rate : 40.9%
Sampling error[2] : Sampling error of percentages not more than +/-4%, that of net values not more than +/-7% and that of ratings not more than +/-0.24 at 95% conf. level
Weighting method : Rim-weighted according to figures provided by the Census and Statistics Department. The gender-age distribution of the Hong Kong population came from “Mid-year population for 2021”, while the educational attainment (highest level attended) distribution and economic activity status distribution came from “Women and Men in Hong Kong – Key Statistics (2021 Edition)”.
  • This figure is the total sample size of the survey. Some questions may only involve a subsample, the size of which can be found in the tables below.
  • All error figures in this release are calculated at 95% confidence level. “95% confidence level” means that if we were to repeat a certain survey 100 times with different random samples, we would expect 95 times having the population parameter within the respective error margins calculated. Because of sampling errors, when quoting percentages, journalists should refrain from reporting decimal places, whereas one decimal place can be used when quoting rating figures.

Social Well-being Indicators

The latest figures of the ten social well-being indicators are summarized as follows:

Date of survey 29/10-3/11/21 7-10/2/22 12-20/5/22 Latest change
Sample size 596-609 599-612 596-617
Response rate 50.1% 58.1% 40.9%
Latest findings Finding Finding Finding & error
Personal safety 6.06 6.13 5.99+/-0.23 -0.14
Personal freedom 5.56 5.57 5.46+/-0.23 -0.10
Opportunities for suitable employment 5.51 5.29 5.03+/-0.17 -0.26[3]
Fairness and justice in judicial proceedings 4.53 4.90[3] 4.75+/-0.22 -0.15
Protection of disadvantaged groups 4.78 4.76 4.74+/-0.20 -0.02
Freedom from fear 4.85 4.72 4.62+/-0.24 -0.11
Happiness of children 4.76 4.53 4.56+/-0.20 +0.03
Housing well-being (“living in peace”) 4.20 4.33 4.17+/-0.20 -0.16
Living without worries 3.97 4.00 3.92+/-0.21 -0.08
Political rights 3.80 3.97 3.90+/-0.24 -0.07
  • The difference between the figure and the result from the previous survey has gone beyond the sampling error at 95% confidence level, meaning that the change is statistically significant prima facie. However, whether the difference is statistically significant is not the same as whether they are practically useful or meaningful, and different weighting methods could have been applied in different surveys.

Our social well-being survey shows that, among the ten specific domains, people rated personal safety the highest. On a scale of 0 to 10, the rating stands at 5.99. Also, people tended to think that Hong Kong people can enjoy personal freedom and have opportunities for suitable employment, attaining ratings of 5.46 and 5.03 respectively. However, the rest of the social well-being indicators score lower than 5, representing people’s relative negative appraisals towards them. The ratings of the following five indicators range from 4.17 to 4.75, which means they tended to think judicial proceedings are not so fair, disadvantaged groups are not adequately protected, Hong Kong people are not free from fear, children are not so happy in their childhood, and it is hard for Hong Kong people to “live in peace”. The last two indicators even score lower than 4, standing at 3.92 and 3.90 respectively, meaning they felt people can’t quite live without worries, and quite some political rights are missing. Among various indicators, the indicator on opportunities for suitable employment has significantly decreased compared to three months ago.

Popularity of SAR Government

Recent popularity figures of the HKSAR Government are summarized as follows:

Date of survey 9-14/12/21 17-20/1/22 21-24/2/22 21-25/3/22 19-22/4/22 12-20/5/22 Latest change
Sample size 589-616 561-602 659-685 614-663 564-658 668-672
Response rate 58.0% 48.4% 49.7% 42.1% 47.6% 40.9%
Latest findings Finding Finding Finding Finding Finding Finding & error
Satisfaction rate of SARG performance[4] 25% 20% 16% 10%[5] 19%[5] 19+/-3%
Dissatisfaction rate of SARG performance[4] 56% 60% 64% 72%[5] 61%[5] 59+/-4% -2%
Net satisfaction rate -31% -39% -48% -62%[5] -42%[5] -40+/-6% +2%
Mean value[4] 2.4 2.2 2.1 1.8[5] 2.2[5] 2.2+/-0.1
Trust in HKSAR Government[4] 39% 36% 30%[5] 24%[5] 37%[5] 35+/-4% -2%
Distrust in HKSAR Government[4] 50%[5] 49% 48% 58%[5] 45%[5] 46+/-4% +1%
Net trust -11% -13% -18% -35%[5] -8%[5] -11+/-7% -3%
Mean value[4] 2.7 2.6 2.5 2.3[5] 2.7[5] 2.7+/-0.1
  • Collapsed from a 5-point scale. The mean value is calculated by quantifying all individual responses into 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 marks according to their degree of positive level, where 1 is the lowest and 5 the highest, and then calculate the sample mean.
  • The difference between the figure and the result from the previous survey has gone beyond the sampling error at 95% confidence level, meaning that the change is statistically significant prima facie. However, whether the difference is statistically significant is not the same as whether they are practically useful or meaningful, and different weighting methods could have been applied in different surveys.

People’s recent appraisals of society’s conditions are summarized as follows:

Date of survey 9-14/12/21 17-20/1/22 21-24/2/22 21-25/3/22 19-22/4/22 12-20/5/22 Latest change
Sample size 1,017 1,001 1,002 1,004 1,001 1,003
Response rate 58.0% 48.4% 49.7% 42.1% 47.6% 40.9%
Latest findings Finding Finding Finding Finding Finding Finding & error
Current political condition:
Satisfaction rate[6]
27% 24% 20%[7] 16%[7] 22%[7] 25+/-3% +3%
Current political condition:
Dissatisfaction rate[6]
53% 53% 55% 57% 52%[7] 49+/-3% -3%
Net satisfaction rate -27% -29% -36%[7] -41% -30%[7] -24+/-5% +6%
Mean value[6] 2.4 2.4 2.2[7] 2.1 2.3[7] 2.4+/-0.1 +0.1
Current livelihood condition:
Satisfaction rate[6]
24% 21% 15%[7] 12% 20%[7] 21+/-3% +1%
Current livelihood condition:
Dissatisfaction rate[6]
52% 57%[7] 66%[7] 69% 57%[7] 53+/-3% -3%
Net satisfaction rate -28% -37%[7] -51%[7] -57% -36%[7] -32+/-5% +4%
Mean value[6] 2.5 2.4[7] 2.1[7] 2.0 2.3[7] 2.4+/-0.1 +0.1
Current economic condition:
Satisfaction rate[6]
23%[7] 17%[7] 13%[7] 9%[7] 14%[7] 15+/-2%
Current economic condition:
Dissatisfaction rate[6]
47% 61%[7] 68%[7] 74%[7] 64%[7] 61+/-3% -3%
Net satisfaction rate -24% -45%[7] -55%[7] -64%[7] -50%[7] -47+/-5% +3%
Mean value[6] 2.6 2.3[7] 2.1[7] 1.9[7] 2.2[7] 2.3+/-0.1
  • Collapsed from a 5-point scale. The mean value is calculated by quantifying all individual responses into 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 marks according to their degree of positive level, where 1 is the lowest and 5 the highest, and then calculate the sample mean.
  • The difference between the figure and the result from the previous survey has gone beyond the sampling error at 95% confidence level, meaning that the change is statistically significant prima facie. However, whether the difference is statistically significant is not the same as whether they are practically useful or meaningful, and different weighting methods could have been applied in different surveys.

Our latest survey shows that the latest satisfaction rate of the HKSAR Government is 19%, whereas dissatisfaction rate stands at 59%, thus the net satisfaction is negative 40 percentage points. The mean score is 2.2, meaning close to “quite dissatisfied” in general. Regarding people’s trust in the HKSAR Government, 35% of the respondents expressed trust, 46% expressed distrust, thus the net trust value is negative 11 percentage points. The mean score is 2.7, meaning between “quite distrust” and “half-half” in general. The above figures have not changed much compared to a month ago.

As for people’s satisfaction with the current political, livelihood and economic conditions, the latest satisfaction rates are 25%, 21% and 15% respectively, while the net satisfaction rates are negative 24, negative 32 and negative 47 percentage points respectively. The mean scores fall between 2.3 and 2.4, meaning between “quite dissatisfied” and “half-half” in general. The above figures also have not changed much compared to a month ago.

Public Sentiment Index

The Public Sentiment Index (PSI) compiled by PORI aims at quantifying Hong Kong people’s sentiments, in order to explain and predict the likelihood of collective behaviour. PSI comprises 2 components: one being Government Appraisal (GA) Score and the other being Society Appraisal (SA) Score. GA refers to people’s appraisal of society’s governance while SA refers to people’s appraisal of the social environment. Both GA and SA scores are compiled from a respective of 4 and 6 opinion survey figures. All PSI, GA and SA scores range between 0 to 200, with 100 meaning normal.

The chart of PSI, GA and SA are shown below:

Latest figure Public Sentiment Index
(PSI): 80.1 (+2.6)
Government Appraisal
(GA): 74.2 (-0.2)
Society Appraisal
(SA): 82.9 (+4.9)

Recent values of PSI, GA, SA and 10 fundamental figures are tabulated as follows:

Cut-off date 11/3/22 25/3/22 7/4/22 22/4/22 6/5/22 20/5/22 Latest change
Public Sentiment Index (PSI) 65.4 57.4 59.4 77.0 77.4 80.1 +2.6
Government Appraisal (GA) 65.7 58.4 62.0 73.6 74.3 74.2 -0.2
Rating of CE 26.6 26.6[8] 33.4 33.4[8] 34.7 34.7[8]
Net approval rate of CE -67% -67%[8] -65% -65%[8] -64% -64%[8]
Mean value of people’s satisfaction with SARG 2.1[8] 1.8 1.8[8] 2.2 2.2[8] 2.2
Mean value of people’s trust in SARG 2.5[8] 2.3 2.3[8] 2.7 2.7[8] 2.7
Society Appraisal (SA) 65.3[8] 58.2 58.2[8] 78.1 78.1[8] 82.9 +4.9
People’s satisfaction with political condition 2.2[8] 2.1 2.1[8] 2.3 2.3[8] 2.4 +0.1
Weighting index of political condition 0.31[8] 0.31[8] 0.31[8] 0.31[8] 0.31[8] 0.31[8]
People’s satisfaction with economic condition 2.1[8] 1.9 1.9[8] 2.2 2.2[8] 2.3
Weighting index of economic condition 0.34[8] 0.34[8] 0.34[8] 0.34[8] 0.34[8] 0.34[8]
People’s satisfaction with livelihood condition 2.1[8] 2.0 2.0[8] 2.3 2.3[8] 2.4 +0.1
Weighting index of livelihood condition 0.35[8] 0.35[8] 0.35[8] 0.35[8] 0.35[8] 0.35[8]
  • PORI will adopt the latest published figures when there are no respective updates.

As for the meaning of the score values, please refer to the following:

Score value Percentile Score value Percentile
140-200 Highest 1% 0-60 Lowest 1%
125 Highest 5% 75 Lowest 5%
120 Highest 10% 80 Lowest 10%
110 Highest 25% 90 Lowest 25%
100 being normal level, meaning half above half below

The latest PSI stands at 80.1, up by 2.6 points from early May. It can be considered as among the worst 9% across the past 20 years or so. Among the two component scores of PSI, the Government Appraisal (GA) Score that reflects people’s appraisal of society’s governance decreases by 0.2 point to 74.2, whereas the Society Appraisal (SA) Score that reflects people’s appraisal of the social environment increases by 4.9 points to 82.9. They can both be considered as among the worst 4% and 13% across the past 20 years or so.

Opinion Daily

In 2007, PORI started collaborating with Wisers Information Limited whereby Wisers supplies to PORI a record of significant events of that day according to the research method designed by PORI. These daily entries would then become “Opinion Daily” after they are verified by PORI.

For some of the polling items covered in this press release, the previous survey was conducted from 7 to 10 February, 2022 while this survey was conducted from 12 to 20 May, 2022. During this period, herewith the significant events selected from counting newspaper headlines and commentaries on a daily basis and covered by at least 25% of the local newspaper articles. Readers can make their own judgment if these significant events have any impacts to different polling figures.

18/5/22 The government releases the 2022 Pay Trend Survey Report.
8/5/22 John Lee is elected as the sixth Chief Executive of Hong Kong with overwhelming votes.
3/5/22 Hong Kong further relaxes social distancing measures on May 19.
22/4/22 The government announces the relaxation of some inbound control measures starting May.
14/4/22 The government begins to relax social distancing measures from April 21.
7/4/22 The government announces the amendment of the new round of Employment Support Scheme.
6/4/22 John Lee resigns to join the Chief Executive election.
4/4/22 Carrie Lam announces that she will not contest the election for the new-term Chief Executive.
3/4/22 The first batch of the new round of electronic consumption vouchers will be distributed on April 7.
21/3/22 The government announces the suspension of the compulsory universal testing scheme.
11/3/22 Hong Kong’s pandemic situation persists and death toll rises sharply.
24/2/22 The Russo-Ukrainian war breaks out.
23/2/22 The government delivers the new Budget, and will spend more than HK$170 billion on counter-cyclical measures.
22/2/22 The government announces the implementation of compulsory mass testing in March.
21/2/22 The government announces the implementation of the Vaccine Pass arrangement starting from February 24.
8/2/22 The government tightens the anti-epidemic measures, limiting multi-household gatherings and launching vaccine pass.

Upcoming Press Releases / Press Conference

  • [Press Release] May 27 (Friday) at 14:30
    Group Gathering Prohibition Index
  • [Press Release] May 31 (Tuesday) at 14:30
    Popularities of disciplinary forces and the PLA Hong Kong Garrison
  • [Press Conference] June 7 (Tuesday) at 14:30
    June Fourth Incident anniversary survey
    Guest commentator: Johnny Lau
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